The Google Forest

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Listening Quiz 2

Google Forest

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Reading Quiz

You may have thought that the age of exploration was over. But you would be wrong. The world is a big place and even in this modern age we are still finding hidden corners–places untouched by humans.

Thanks to our modern age exploring has become a lot easier. In 2005, a scientist at London’s [tippy title="Kew Gardens"]Link here![/tippy] discovered a rainforest, but he didn’t have to travel halfway around the world to do it. He didn’t even have to leave his desk.

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Dr. Julian Bayliss, a conservation scientist, was using Google Earth to search for rainforests in Africa. One day, he discovered a large area of lush forest on a peak called Mount Mabu in Mozambique. In fact, at 27 square miles, it turned out to be the largest medium-altitude rainforest in Africa. Moreover, he discovered the area had never been studied before.

Next, Kew Gardens sent a research team to Mount Mabu. What they discovered was beyond their wildest expectations. The forest was full of endangered species of birds, orchids, trees, large animals such as monkeys, and antelopes and many kinds of insects. They even found completely unknown species on the first visit.

Mount Mabu Map

Since its discovery, the government of Mozambique has worked to protect the ‘Google Forest’ as it is sometimes called. For one thing, commercial logging is banned in the area and it has been made into a national park.

 

[LDAdvQuiz 2]

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Meaning Check 2

Google Forest slow Google Forest fast

[tippy title ="You may have thought that" header=“off”] ~と思ったかもしれない[/tippy] [tippy title ="the age of exploration" header=“off”] 大航海時代[/tippy] [tippy title ="was over" header=“off”] 終わった[/tippy]. But [tippy title ="you would be wrong" header=“off”] それは間違っている[/tippy]. The world is a big place and [tippy title ="even in this modern age" header=“off”] 現代世界においても[/tippy] [tippy title ="we are still finding hidden corners" header=“off”] 今も、世界の隠れた隅々[/tippy]–places [tippy title ="untouched by humans" header=“off”] 人間の手付かずの[/tippy].

[tippy title ="Thanks to" header=“off”] ~のおかげで[/tippy] our modern age [tippy title ="exploring" header=“off”] 探検すること[/tippy] [tippy title ="has become a lot easier" header=“off”] はるかに楽になった[/tippy]. In 2005, a scientist at London’s [tippy title ="Kew Gardens" header=“off”] キューガーデン Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew [subtippy title=”(image)”]Link here![/subtippy] はイギリスの首都ロンドン南西部のキューにある王立植物園。キュー植物園などとも呼ばれる。[/tippy] [tippy title ="discovered a rainforest" header=“off”] 熱帯雨林を発見した[/tippy], but he [tippy title ="didn't have to travel halfway around the world to do it" header=“off”] それをするのに世界の裏側まで行かなくてもよかった[/tippy]. He [tippy title ="didn't even have to leave his desk" header=“off”] 席を離れる必要もなかった[/tippy].

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Dr. Julian Bayliss, [tippy title ="a conservation scientist" header=“off”] 環境保護研究員[/tippy], [tippy title ="was using Google Earth" header=“off”] グーグルアース を使っていた◆Google Earth – Google社が提供する世界規模の衛星写真閲覧ソフトウェア。マウス操作で地球上のあらゆる場所の衛星写真が確認でき、車や人が見える程度まで拡大できる。無料版もありホームページよりダウンロードが可能。◆URLhttp://earth.google.com/[/tippy] [tippy title ="to search for rainforests" header=“off”] 熱帯雨林を探すために[/tippy] in Africa. One day, he discovered [tippy title ="a large area of lush forest on a peak called Mount Mabu" header=“off”] マウントマブという山の頂きに幅広い生い茂った森[/tippy] in Mozambique. [tippy title ="In fact" header=“off”] 実際[/tippy], [tippy title ="at 27 square miles" header=“off”] 27平方マイル(約43平方キロ)で[/tippy], [tippy title ="it turned out " header=“off”] ~であるとわかった[/tippy] to be the largest [tippy title ="medium-altitude" header=“off”] 中高度の[/tippy] rainforest in Africa. [tippy title ="Moreover" header=“off”] その上に[/tippy], he discovered the area [tippy title ="had never been studied before" header=“off”] 研究されたことはなかった[/tippy].

Next, Kew Gardens [tippy title ="sent a research team to Mount Mabu" header=“off”] マウントマブに研究チームを派遣した[/tippy]. [tippy title ="What they discovered" header=“off”] 発見したことは[/tippy] was [tippy title ="beyond their wildest expectations" header=“off”] 想像もつかないほど[/tippy]. The forest was [tippy title ="full of" header=“off”] ~でいっぱいである[/tippy] [tippy title ="endangered species of birds" header=“off”] 絶滅危惧種の鳥の宝庫[/tippy], [tippy title ="orchids" header=“off”] ラン、蘭、蘭の花[/tippy], trees, large animals such as monkeys, and [tippy title ="antelopes" header=“off”] 《動物》レイヨウ、アンテロープ◆アフリカおよびアジア南西部原産の、枝分かれしない角を持つウシ科の偶蹄類の総称で、インパラ、ガゼル、スプリングボックなどが含まれる。[/tippy] and many kinds of [tippy title ="insects" header=“off”] 昆虫[/tippy]. [tippy title ="They even found completely unknown species" header=“off”] 全く未知の種まで発見した[/tippy] on the first visit.

Mount Mabu Map

[tippy title ="Since its discovery" header=“off”] その発見以来[/tippy], [tippy title ="the government of Mozambique" header=“off”] モザンビーク政府[/tippy] [tippy title ="has worked to protect" header=“off”] 保護する政策に乗り出した[/tippy] the ‘Google Forest’ [tippy title ="as it is sometimes called" header=“off”] 時に~と呼ばれる[/tippy]. [tippy title ="For one thing" header=“off”] 一例を挙げると[/tippy], [tippy title ="commercial logging is banned" header=“off”] 商業的木材の切り出しは禁止されている[/tippy] in the area and [tippy title ="it has been made into a national park" header=“off”] 国立公園にされた[/tippy].

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The Lapa: Never Lose Anything Again!

Lapa Colors

The Lapa slow The Lapa fast

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[tippy title ="Do you have trouble" header=“off”] ~に苦労しているか[/tippy] [tippy title ="keeping up with your things" header=“off”] 自分のものをきちんと管理する[/tippy]? [tippy title ="Are you constantly misplacing items" header=“off”] あなたは絶えずものを置き忘れている[/tippy] and [tippy title ="wasting your precious time" header=“off”] 貴重な時間を無駄にしている[/tippy] …

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The Lapa: Never Lose Anything Again ラパ:二度と何もなくさない
Do you have trouble 〜に苦労しているか
keeping up with your things 自分のものをきちんと管理する
Are you constantly misplacing items あなたは絶えずものを置き忘れている
wasting your precious time 貴重な時間を無駄にしている

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Do you have trouble keeping up with your things? Are you constantly misplacing items and wasting your precious time hunting for them? Then the Lapa may be what you need.

Lapas communicating

The Lapa is a device that you attach to something you don’t want to lose. When you do misplace an object with a Lapa, you use the Lapa App on your smart phone to search for it. You can scan a Lapa up to 70 meters away in optimum conditions. But the Lapa’s real power lies in its network. As a Lapa communicates with other Lapas in a Lapa network, you can find your Lapa virtually anywhere. For example, when another Lapa comes near your lost Lapa it will update your Lapa’s position automatically but without accessing its data. Your data is always securely protected.

Lapa vs quarter

A Lapa is hardly bigger than a quarter and weighs only five grams. They are powered by a CR2016 battery, which can last up to eight months and are easily replaceable. You can manage an unlimited number of Lapas with the Lapa App. You can even manage your friends’ Lapas if they need help finding them.

Lapas can be attached to almost anything you don’t want to lose. You can stick it on or hang it from a string or just drop it inside.

Lapa and wallet

Lapas even work with social media. You can share access to your Lapa with friends on Facebook and they can help you find it. Or if you choose, you can use the ‘Go Public’ feature and ask for help from the whole Lapa community. Anyone can help you search with the free Lapa App.

Lapas are expected to start shipping this April. Find out more about the Lapa at the following link: http://lapa-app.com/
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The Drones Are Coming!

The Drones are Coming

Consumer Drones slow Consumer Drones fast

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[tippy title ="The other day" header=“off”] 先日[/tippy], someone [tippy title ="sent me a link" header=“off”] リンクを送ってきた[/tippy] to [tippy title ="an awesome aerial video" header=“off”] 素晴らしい空中のビデオ[/tippy] of Takeda Castle in Japan. (See video below.) [tippy title ="At first" header=“off”] 最初は[/tippy], [tippy title ="I assumed that" header=“off”] 思い込んでいた[/tippy] [tippy title ="it had been shot using a helicopter" header=“off”] ヘリコプターを使って撮影された[/tippy], but [tippy title ="as I was watching the video" header=“off”] そのビデオを見ていたら[/tippy] [tippy title ="I realized that" header=“off”] 気付いた[/tippy] …

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The Drones Are Coming! 無人機が到来!
The other day 先日
sent me a link リンクを送ってきた
an awesome aerial video 素晴らしい空中のビデオ
At first 最初は
I assumed that 思い込んでいた
it had been shot using a helicopter ヘリコプターを使って撮影された
as I was watching the video そのビデオを見ていたら
I realized that 気付いた

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The other day, someone sent me a link to an awesome aerial video of Takeda Castle in Japan. (See video below.) At first, I assumed that it had been shot using a helicopter, but as I was watching the video I realized that it had been made with a drone. This got me interested, so I checked the YouTube Channel of the video. There, I discovered a description of how the video was made and the drone that was used—the Dji Phantom 2 Ready to Fly Quadcopter.

quadcopter

I have seen drones used for filming at the Olympics or other such events, but I always assumed they were very expensive. I was surprised to find that this drone was only about $1,200. Actually, there are even cheaper models; the cheapest ones start at around 300 dollars including the camera. I immediately thought I want my own drone.

Of course I am not the only one. Drones are already flying off the shelves in the US. According to an analysis by the Teal Group, sales of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) will reach $8.2 billion dollars by the end of this decade. This is incredible growth for a category that did not even exists a few years ago.

As usual, powerful technologies bring serious problems. There have already been reports of amateur-operated drones crashing into downtown buildings or dropping onto crowded city streets— not to mention issues of privacy invasion. As of now, they are largely unregulated in most countries.

What do you think? Are you ready for your own drone or do you think they should be more tightly regulated?

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The Earth Narrowly Dodges a Disaster

CME ESL listening

CME slow CMEfast

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[tippy title ="While you were going about your day" header=“off”] 一日を過ごしている時 [/tippy] on February 24th of this year, the sun [tippy title ="was ejecting" header=“off”] 放出していた[/tippy] [tippy title ="a massive jet of particles into space" header=“off”] 宇宙へ巨大な粒子の噴流[/tippy]. This [tippy title ="phenomenon" header=“off”] 現象[/tippy] [tippy title ="is known as a CME" header=“off”] CMEとして知られている ◆coronal mass ejection《天文》コロナガスの噴出[/tippy], a coronal mass ejection …

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The Earth Narrowly Dodges a Disaster 地球は、間一髪で災害を回避
While you were going about your day 一日を過ごしている時 
was ejecting 放出していた
a massive jet of particles into space 宇宙へ巨大な粒子の噴流
phenomenon 現象
is known as a CME CMEとして知られている ◆coronal mass ejection (天文)コロナガスの噴出

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While you were going about your day on February 24th of this year, the sun was ejecting a massive jet of particles into space. This phenomenon is known as a CME, a coronal mass ejection and they often come after a solar flare.

Luckily for us on earth, this one was not pointing our way. According to scientists, this CME was one of the most massive ever observed. If it had hit the earth, it would have severely damaged communication networks and power grids all over the globe. They estimate the damages would have been over 2.6 trillion dollars. To put it in perspective, that is ten times more costly than the Fukushima disaster, the most expensive disaster in history.

The last time the earth was hit by a similar CME was in the mid-19th century. People said that the night skies were so lit up by solar radiation it was as bright as daylight.

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The Selfie Stick

selfie nyc

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[tippy title ="You can't deny that" header=“off”] 〔that以下〕ということは否定できない[/tippy] [tippy title ="the selfie" header=“off”] 自分撮り、自分で撮った写真[/tippy] has become very popular. [tippy title ="In fact" header=“off”] 実際に(は)[/tippy], it was the Oxford Dictionary’s [tippy title ="word of the year" header=“off”] その年の言葉, その年の一番の流行語[/tippy] for 2013. [tippy title ="In the same year" header=“off”] 同じ年に[/tippy], we saw [tippy title ="the Obamas" header=“off”] [/tippy] and even …

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The Selfie Stick セルフスティック
You can’t deny that 〔that以下〕ということは否定できない
the selfie 自分撮り、自分で撮った写真
In fact 実際に(は)
word of the year その年の言葉, その年の一番の流行語
In the same year 同じ年に

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You can’t deny that the selfie has become very popular. In fact, it was the Oxford Dictionary’s word of the year for 2013. In the same year, we saw [tippy title ="the Obamas" header=“off”] [/tippy] and even [tippy title ="the Pope" header=“off”] [/tippy] join the fad.

Selfies are easy to take when it is just yourself or maybe a couple of your friends, but it is very difficult with groups of four or more. Until recently, to make a group selfie you needed freakishly long arms or very small friends. Otherwise, somebody gets left out. But now, thanks to a new invention from Indonesia, the selfie is not just for yourself.

The invention is called the monopod or the selfie stick and it was developed by a young woman by the name of Diana Hemas Sari. The selfie stick is an extendable metal wand that has a plastic handle at the end with a clip to hold a smartphone. It has become wildly popular among young people in her native Indonesia and several other countries in southeast Asia and is spreading fast. You should expect to see it in your area soon.

What do you think? Would you rather ask someone to take your picture or just pull out your selfie stick?

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Researchers Discover a Universal Word

yada yada huh

Huh? slow Huh? fast

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[tippy title ="Researchers have discovered" header=“off”] 研究者が~を発見した[/tippy] [tippy title ="an almost universal word" header=“off”] ほとんどすべての言語に共通する言葉[/tippy]. “Huh?” You say?

[tippy title ="Even if you are not a native speaker of English" header=“off”] たとえあなたが英語のネイティブでなくても[/tippy], you probably don’t need a translation for “Huh?” It appears that the word, [tippy title ="or a very similar form of it" header=“off”] またはとてもそれに似たような[/tippy], [tippy title ="is used in most of the languages in the world" header=“off”] 世界のほとんどの言語に用いられる[/tippy].

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English 日本語
Researchers Discover a Universal Word 研究者がすべてに共通する言葉を発見した
Researchers have discovered 研究者が〜を発見した
an almost universal word ほとんどすべての言語に共通する言葉
Even if you are not a native speaker of English たとえあなたが英語のネイティブでなくても
or a very similar form of it またはとてもそれに似たような
is used in most of the languages in the world 世界のほとんどの言語に用いられる

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Researchers have discovered an almost universal word. “Huh?” You say?

Even if you are not a native speaker of English, you probably don’t need a translation for “Huh?” It appears that the word, or a very similar form of it, is used in most of the languages in the world.

Until now, there was very little written about ‘huh’ in linguistic literature. It was thought to be an unimportant feature of language. Thinking there was perhaps more to it, some researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands decided to look into the matter. They began analyzing recordings of ten different languages, including Spanish, Chinese, Icelandic and indigenous languages from Australia, South America and Africa to see whether these other languages had a similar word with the same function. They discovered that in every one of the languages, speakers would use roughly the same sound to ask for a clarification or when they wanted their counterpart to repeat something.

Generally, when words are similar in different languages they share the same origin. These are called cognates. But most of the languages in the study were completely unrelated to the others. The word “huh” in these languages could not have been a cognate. This meant that “huh” is a very different kind of word.

The scientists suspect that the same sound is used because it is the most efficient way to ask for someone to explain something further or to clarify their statement. They compare it to convergent evolution. Convergent evolution is when similar environments cause the evolution of similar features in unrelated species.

How do you say “huh” in your native language? Feel free to let me know in our Facebook comments section.

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Hear “Huh?” in the 10 different languages from the study.

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